Monthly Archives: November 2014

The MAHB’s new look Website – More than just appearances

1The Millennium Alliance for Humanity and the Biosphere (MAHB) at Stanford University is a parnter with Sustainability Central and are proud to announce their brand new website, as Erika Gavenus explains:
Read the rest of this entry

A New Frontier: Unintended consequences and unintended opportunities

2222222Don Kennedy

In Vannever Bush’s post- World War 2 letter on behalf of Federal science, he spoke of the new opportunities for science in a metaphor – it was to be an “endless frontier.” The Lewis and Clark expedition had been reunited with Jefferson only a century or so before Bush wrote. So here was a newly described terrain that might function as a “science commons” – a place that could welcome Bush’s foreseen partnership between government and research.

For a time, that vision worked perfectly: tax money supported good science practiced in universities or a few independent laboratories. But in 1980, the Congress recalled that a major objective of Bush’s was that publicly supported research should yield benefits to commerce – where, they wanted to know, were the patents they had expected? Read the rest of this entry

Paul Ehrlich and Dick Smiths discuss ‘Sustainable Population and Economy for Human Well-being’

On Thursday, November 6th, Paul Ehrlich and Dick Smith discussed Sustainable Population and Economy for Human Well-being at the University of Tasmania. Click the image below to watch the video online:

 

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The Legacy of Lima?

Critically Endangerd Arabian Leopard (Panthera pardus nimr) (C) Copyright 2014 by Michael Charles Tobias

Critically Endangerd Arabian Leopard (Panthera pardus nimr)
(C) Copyright 2014 by Michael Charles Tobias

Michael Charles Tobias and Jane Gray Morrison

At Yale University October 14th, Todd Stern, the U.S. Special Envoy for Climate Change, suggested that – along lines of what is now being termed New Zealand’s approach – the way towards a climate change treaty involves creating fluid parameters on a nation-by-nation basis. Said Stern, if countries come together and work through it according to the best wisdom on the table at present (our characterization of the way New Zealand’s strategy is being perceived) then, Stern goes on to say, “we would have for the first time established a stable, durable, rules-based agreement with legal force that is more ambitious than ever before, even if not yet ambitious enough – an agreement that is applicable to all in a genuine and not just a formalistic manner.”  Read the rest of this entry

Paul Ehrlich and Dick Smith to present in Hobart Tasmania – 6th November, 2014

Paul Ehrlich and Dick Smith will be discussing: Sustainable Population and Economy for Human Well-being in Hobart Tasmania on Thursday, November 6th, 2014 at 5pm (AEDT). To learn more about the event and to register, CLICK HERE. 

If you can’t attend you can stream the event live by following this link.

When: Thursday November 6th, 2014

Time: 5:00m-6:00pm (AEDT)

Where: Stanley Burbury Theatre, University Centre, Sandy Bay campus. Hobart, Tasmania  Read the rest of this entry

Changing the World – Using the Humanity System idea

Michael Tuckson is now a writer. For most of his working life he was an advisor in rural development in Thailand and Laos, and government and university staffer in Australia. He has degrees in geology, palaeoecology and human geography.

Michael Tuckson is now a writer. For most of his working life he was an advisor in rural development in Thailand and Laos, and government and university staffer in Australia. He has degrees in geology, palaeoecology and human geography.

Michael Tuckson

Paul Ehrlich’s first visit to Australia in 1970 drew me away from doctoral studies in palaeoecology towards a tutorship in human geography and a new life increasingly in human affairs. In two geography subjects, Paul and Anne Ehrlich’s seminal text Population, Resources, Environment that addressed human ecology was used alongside more obviously social and geographical texts. At this stage, almost fresh from the natural sciences, I cheerily called for the integration of the social sciences. Subsequently, the exotic allure of Thailand enticed me away, first for fieldwork towards an MA and later for work as an advisor in ‘rural development’ in Thailand and Laos. Read the rest of this entry

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