Monthly Archives: December 2013

One Effect of Climate Change Myths: Solution Denial

John Harte

Education Scotland

Education Scotland

In my previous blog, I briefly reviewed the many myths that climate science deniers have propagated over the past several decades and stated, “Now, with compelling evidence from around the world of unacceptable damage from climate warming, the most pernicious myth of all has emerged:  the costs of preventing future catastrophic warming will be more painful than the cost of suffering global warming.” Read the rest of this entry

Australia: Under-populated yet overexploited?

David J Booth

Photo courtesy of http://www.habitatadvocate.com.au

Photo courtesy of http://www.habitatadvocate.com.au

When one thinks of a country with everything going for it, in terms of a sustainable future and high quality-of-life, Australia springs to mind.

Vast land area, clean seas, a tiny population by world standards (under 3 people per km2, the lowest of any sizeable country, 53 people per km2 – world average)  and a highly educated and wealthy population.  Also since we cram our population into big cities (over 50 %, one of the most urbanised countries on Earth) a traveller to Australia sees vast empty spaces and would find them pristine.

Read the rest of this entry

The University of Wollongong Alumni Awards

Out of 30 potential candidates at the University of Wollongong (UOW) Alumni Awards, SC Director of Health Professor Patricia Davidson was awarded the inaugural Outstanding Alumni award for UOW,  a fantastic recognition of her tireless work in health (Click for award citation).

Last Thursday, Martha Hill, Jane Phillips and Louise Hickman attended the UOW Alumni awards in support of Trish’s achievement.

Congratulations Trish!

Professor Jane Phillips (L) with Professor Martha Hill

Professor Jane Phillips (L) with Professor Martha Hill

Professor Jane Phillips (L) with Dr Louise Hickman

Professor Jane Phillips (L) with Dr Louise Hickman

 

Target Kiwi – By Paul R. Ehrlich

Paul R. Ehrlich

boThe approach to the airstrip of remote, hilly Stewart Island at the southern end of New Zealand, was squirrelly in strong winds, but the pilot expertly dropped the Cherokee Six on the runway.  Anne and I and two companions had come to see a conservation project of a foundation, Dancing Star, run by our friend Michael Tobias. Read the rest of this entry

‘Two very different population books’ – By Paul R. Ehrlich

Paul R. Ehrlich

blog postIf you’re lucky enough to grow old, you have the privilege of being commented on by historians.  That happened to me recently with the publication of “The Bet: Paul Ehrlich, Julian Simon, and Our Gamble Over Earth’s Future” by Yale historian Paul Sabin. Read the rest of this entry

Resources: Rare Minerals Vs Biodiversity

Paul R. Ehrlich and Anne H. Ehrlich

Wildebeest crossing the Mara River in Tanzania.  Photo by Paul R. Ehrlich

Wildebeest crossing the Mara River in Tanzania. Photo by Paul R. Ehrlich

The Ok Tedi copper and gold mine dumped 80,000 tons of tailings – containing copper, zinc, cadmium, and lead directly into the Ok Tedi and Fly rivers (Papua New Guinea’s second largest river system). Read the rest of this entry

Truly sustainable bioenergy in East Africa?

Written By:

Thomas Buchholz – Gund Institute for Ecological Economics, University of Vermont, USA
Peik Stenlund – Co-Founder Pamoja Cleantech AB, Stockholm, Sweden and Kampala, Uganda
Stephen Christensen – Chalmers University, Göteborg, Sweden
Léonore Joërg – Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines de Nantes, France

A gasifier in rural Uganda providing basic electricity services.

A gasifier in rural Uganda providing basic electricity services.

95% of the people in rural areas in East Africa have no access to electricity. Read the rest of this entry

POPULATION AND “NATURAL” DISASTERS

Paul R. Ehrlich

post pic 16

Courtesy of CNN – Tananun, Philippines, November 2013.

 Think of all the “natural disasters” with which we’re afflicted: tsunamis, earthquakes, volcanoes, storm surges, hurricanes, cyclones, and so on.  And note that the impacts of such events are almost always worse if the human population affected is large.  Typhoon Haiyan’s severity in 2013 was likely population related because the huge population of Homo sapiens is heating the planet and increasing the odds that typhoons will be more severe.  Read the rest of this entry

GEOENGINEERING: AN IDEA WHOSE TIME HAS GONE

Paul R. Ehrlich and Andrew Beattie

Paul Ehrlich 13As it has become more and more evident that humanity is not going to rapidly stop burning fossil fuels, some very worried scientists have increasingly turned their thoughts to reduce global warming.  Read the rest of this entry

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